The Omega-3 Quiz

Ready to test your omega-3 knowledge?

This quiz only takes a few minutes to complete, and may add to your knowledge of heart health. The questions explore the differences between fish oil dietary supplements, generic DHA-containing omega-3s, and FDA-approved VASCEPA® (icosapent ethyl). Please answer all 4 questions before clicking submit. You may change your answers at any time until you submit the full quiz.
Certain fish oil dietary supplements and generic omega-3s contain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which may raise a patient's "bad" cholesterol (LDL-C).
Incorrect!

Many common fish oil dietary supplements and generic omega-3s contain DHA, which has the potential to raise “bad” cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and may undo your efforts to manage patients’ CV health.1-3 VASCEPA is icosapent ethyl (IPE), a single purified ingredient that is FDA approved and proven to reduce CV risk in adults on maximally tolerated statins with TG ≥150 mg/dL and established CVD or diabetes and ≥2 CVD risk factors.4

Fish oil dietary supplements are FDA approved to treat medical conditions including the management of CV risk.
Incorrect!

Fish oil dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA as food, not drugs. They are not approved to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.5 VASCEPA is different. It is icosapent ethyl (IPE)—FDA approved to significantly reduce CV risk in adults on maximally tolerated statins with TG ≥150 mg/dL and established CVD or diabetes and ≥2 CVD risk factors.4

The composition and content of fish oil dietary supplements are consistent and accurately described on their labels.
Incorrect!

Fish oil dietary supplements do not have to meet strict FDA standards for prescription drug approval, so they frequently vary in actual DHA and EPA content and composition. Plus, they can contain up to 36% saturated fats and oxidized lipids.1,6,7 VASCEPA is icosapent ethyl (IPE), which has undergone a proprietary purification process, leaving only a single purified ingredient* proven to reduce CV risk in adults on maximally tolerated statins with TG ≥150 mg/dL and established CVD or diabetes and ≥2 CVD risk factors.4 As you know, products that contain DHA may raise “bad” cholesterol (LDL-C), which is why it is important to know the difference between fish oil dietary supplements and VASCEPA when it comes to supporting CV health.2,3,8

Generic DHA-containing omega-3s have shown clinical evidence demonstrating an impact on cardiovascular risk.
Incorrect!

5 trials in the omega-3 class that studied fish oil or mixtures of omega-3 fatty acids that include DHA have failed to demonstrate an impact on the primary cardiovascular endpoint studied.9-13† In the VASCEPA CV Outcomes Trial (REDUCE-IT®), VASCEPA demonstrated a 25% RRR in CV events for adults on maximally tolerated statins with TG ≥150 mg/dL and established CVD or diabetes and ≥2 CVD risk factors.4
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No large, well-controlled, head-to-head clinical trials have been conducted between VASCEPA and omega-3 mixtures.
Cross-trial comparisons are subject to differences in populations, primary outcomes, and other trial design aspects.
DHA-containing products are not FDA approved for co-administration with statins to affect lipid, lipoprotein, or inflammation parameters with the aim of reducing CV mortality or morbidity.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

VASCEPA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity (e.g., anaphylactic reaction) to VASCEPA or any of its components

VASCEPA was associated with an increased risk (3% vs 2%) of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter requiring hospitalization in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The incidence of atrial fibrillation was greater in patients with a previous history of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter

It is not known whether patients with allergies to fish and/or shellfish are at an increased risk of an allergic reaction to VASCEPA. Patients with such allergies should discontinue VASCEPA if any reactions occur

INDICATIONS AND LIMITATIONS OF USE

VASCEPA® (icosapent ethyl) is indicated as an adjunct to maximally tolerated statin therapy to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization and unstable angina requiring hospitalization in adult patients with elevated triglyceride (TG) levels (≥150 mg/dL) and established cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus and 2 or more additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease

VASCEPA is indicated as an adjunct to diet to reduce TG levels in adult patients with severe (≥500 mg/dL) hypertriglyceridemia

The effect of VASCEPA on the risk for pancreatitis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia has not been determined.

VASCEPA was associated with an increased risk (12% vs 10%) of bleeding in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The incidence of bleeding was greater in patients receiving concomitant antithrombotic medications, such as aspirin, clopidogrel or warfarin

Common adverse reactions in the cardiovascular outcomes trial (incidence ≥3% and ≥1% more frequent than placebo): musculoskeletal pain (4% vs 3%), peripheral edema (7% vs 5%), constipation (5% vs 4%), gout (4% vs 3%) and atrial fibrillation (5% vs 4%)

Common adverse reactions in the hypertriglyceridemia trials (incidence ≥1% more frequent than placebo): arthralgia (2% vs 1%) and oropharyngeal pain (1% vs 0.3%)

Adverse Events, Product Complaints, or Special Situations may be reported by contacting AmarinConnect at 1-855-VASCEPA, emailing [email protected], or calling the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088

Patients receiving VASCEPA and concomitant anticoagulants and/or anti-platelet agents should be monitored for bleeding

Please see full Prescribing Information for more information on VASCEPA.

Visual representations are for illustrative purposes only. The capsule shown is not an identical representation of the product.

CV=cardiovascular; FDA=Food and Drug Administration; LDL-C=low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

CV=cardiovascular; CVD=cardiovascular disease; EPA=eicosapentaenoic acid; FDA=Food and Drug Administration; LDL-C=low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; TG=triglyceride.

*Data on file.

The 5 trials were: ORIGIN, Risk and Prevention Study, OMEGA, ASCEND, and VITAL.

Cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, and unstable angina requiring hospitalization.

References: 1. Mason RP, Sherratt SC. Omega-3 fatty acid fish oil dietary supplements contain saturated fats and oxidized lipids that may interfere with their intended biological benefits. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2017;483(1):425-429. 2. Jacobson TA, Glickstein SB, Rowe JD, Soni PN. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipids: a review. J Clin Lipidol. 2012;6(1):5-18. 3. Wei MY, Jacobson TA. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on serum lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2011;13(6):474-483. 4. VASCEPA [package insert]. Bridgewater, NJ: Amarin Pharma, Inc.; 2019. 5. US Food and Drug Administration. Food facts: Dietary supplements. https://www.fda.gov/media/79995/download. Accessed November 19, 2020. 6. Hilleman D, Smer A. Prescription omega-3 fatty acid products and dietary supplements are not interchangeable. Manag Care. 2016;25(1):46-52. 7. Kleiner AC, Cladis DP, Santerre CR. A comparison of actual versus stated label amounts of EPA and DHA in commercial omega-3 dietary supplements in the United States. J Sci Food Agric. 2015;95(6):1260-1267. 8. Lovaza [package insert]. Research Triangle Park, NC: GlaxoSmithKline; 2019. 9. ORIGIN Trial Investigators; Bosch J, Gerstein HC, Dagenais GR, et al. n–3 fatty acids and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with dysglycemia. N Engl J Med. 2012;367(4):309-318. 10. Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group. n–3 fatty acids in patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(19):1800-1808. 11. Rauch B, Schiele R, Schneider S, et al; for the OMEGA Study Group. OMEGA, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to test the effect of highly purified omega-3 fatty acids on top of modern guideline-adjusted therapy after myocardial infarction. Circulation. 2010;122(21):2152-2159. 12. ASCEND Study Collaborative Group; Bowman L, Mafham M, Wallendszus K, et al. Effects of n−3 Fatty Acid Supplements in Diabetes Mellitus. N Engl J Med. 2018;379(16):1540-1550. 13. Manson JE, Cook NR, Lee IM, et al. Marine n−3 Fatty Acids and Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer. N Engl J Med. 2019;380(1):23-32.